NOLA-Brewing

Sauvage – NOLA Brewing

 

I’m pretty excited about this one, or should I say this series!  The Funk series is a series of sour ales all named after New Orleans street names.  Today I’ll be looking at Sauvage, which I was lucky enough to find for sale in Baton Rouge.  I also got to try Piety a few days ago at the Chimes, and it was delicious!  But then again, who doesn’t like a lacto/Brett blend aged on cherries?

This upcoming weekend I’m really looking forward to finally making my way to NOLA to check out their new tap-room.  I’ve seen many pictures and reviews, but I really can’t wait to check it out for myself.  I’ve often said that more breweries in Louisiana should look at NOLA Brewing as THE model for rules and guidelines of how to operate a taproom.  One reason I’ve always loved to go to the old taproom there is because of the one off’ beers that are ALWAYS available, stuff you can’t get in the stores.  Also, they always have someone engaging and very knowledgable bartending.  It’s not about bands, or trivia, or what’s on tv (unless it’s the Saints), it’s all about the beer.

Here’s a little bit about Sauvage from the brewery:

Sauvage Street is named for the wild swamp and native American campgrounds that initially occupied the area during European development.  Though it has long since been tamed and developed, for two weeks every spring Sauvage street is transformed back into the wild heart of the city, acting as the main entrance to jazz fest.  You can hear it beat out loud.

The wild side of pale, Sauvage is rebirth pale fermented with the Dirty Dozen brett blend (ECY34) entirely in French oak barrels, resulting in woody and earthy notes.  Finally, Sauvage is finished with not one, but two encores of dry hopping.  Because of the high level of aroma hopping, this beer is best enjoyed fresh, in good company, while getting a little wild.

Now, on to the beer.  This 100% brett pale ale pours a hazy golden color.   To spite an earlier review on this beer I read, my Sauvage had great lacing and retention on the head, but then again, I guess it’s all in how you pour.

From the aroma, I get an assortment of smells.  The first one that hits me is a piney aroma, and the second big note I get is a lemon zest aroma, with a slight orange or citrus aroma.

Once this thing hits my taste buds I’m really impressed by the piney hop bitterness, this is truly a sour for the hop heads!  It’s not very sour, which again, I can appreciate because it really allows the bitterness to stand out.  There is a bit of maltiness in the taste, but for me is just the right amount, as I always prefer the hops to shine over the malt.

The mouthfeel is very light and dry, leaving you with a nice hoppy, bitter aftertaste.  This seems like a great beer for this time of year, the lightness and light carbonation work really well with the warm temperatures in this region.

 

  I’m pretty excited about this one, or should I say this series!  The Funk series is a series of sour ales all named after New Orleans street names.  Today I’ll be looking at Sauvage, which I was lucky enough to find for sale in Baton Rouge.  I also got to try Piety a few days ago at the Chimes, and it was delicious!  But then again, who doesn’t like a lacto/Brett blend aged on cherries? This upcoming weekend I’m really looking forward to finally making my way to NOLA to check out their new tap-room.  I’ve seen many pictures and reviews, but I really can’t wait to check it out for myself.  I’ve often said that more breweries in Louisiana should look at NOLA Brewing as THE model for rules and guidelines of how to operate a taproom.  One reason I’ve always loved to go to the old taproom there is because of the one off’ beers that are ALWAYS available, stuff you can’t get in the stores.  Also, they always have someone engaging and very knowledgable bartending.  It’s not about bands, or trivia, or what’s on tv (unless it’s the Saints), it’s all about the beer. Here’s a little bit about Sauvage from the brewery:

Sauvage Street is named for the wild swamp and native American campgrounds that initially occupied the area during European development.  Though it has long since been tamed and developed, for two weeks every spring Sauvage street is transformed back into the wild heart of the city, acting as the main entrance to jazz fest.  You can hear it beat out loud. The wild side of pale, Sauvage is rebirth pale fermented with the Dirty Dozen brett blend (ECY34) entirely in French oak barrels, resulting in woody and earthy notes.  Finally, Sauvage is finished with not one, but two encores of dry hopping.  Because of the high level of aroma hopping, this beer is best enjoyed fresh, in good company, while getting a little wild.

Now, on to the beer.  This 100% brett pale ale pours a hazy golden color.   To spite an earlier review on this beer I read, my Sauvage had great lacing and retention on the head, but then again, I guess it’s all in how you pour. From the aroma, I get an assortment of smells.  The first one that hits me is a piney aroma, and the second big note I get is a lemon zest aroma, with a slight orange or citrus aroma. Once this thing hits my taste buds I’m really impressed by the piney hop bitterness, this is truly a sour for the hop heads!  It’s not very sour, which again, I can appreciate because it really allows the bitterness to stand out.  There is a bit of maltiness in the taste, but for me is just the right…

Sauvage – Nola Brewing


Appearance – 84%


Aroma – 80%


Flavor – 82%


Mouthfeel – 82%



82%

Outstanding!

This beer is a winner. I love how the hops stand out, and as a sour, it doesn’t have the acidity that I’ve become accustomed to with sours. That’s a plus in my book. This is one drinkable sour ale that I think will appeal to many people, especially the hop heads!

User Rating: 4.3 ( 1 votes)

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